Huri Te Ao Hoahoanga - School of Future Environments
Aotearoa New Zealand
  PhD, BDes (Int Arch).  Author of Regenerative Urban Design and Ecosystem Biomimicry  
Auckland University of Technology

Te Wānanga Aronui O Tāmaki Makaurau

Dr Maibritt Pedersen Zari 


Associate Professor

International / Governmental / Council Reports

(click on the icons for links to the papers)

BLASCHKE, P., CHAPMAN, R., GYDE, E., HOWDEN-CHAPMAN, P., OMBLER, J., PEDERSEN ZARI, M., PERRY, M., RANDAL, E. 2020

Green Space in Wellington’s Central City: Current Provision, and Design for Future Wellbeing 

A Report for Wellington City Council prepared by the New Zealand Centre for Sustainable Cities


Urban green spaces are an essential part of Wellington City, for the wellbeing of residents and the local environment, and for city resilience. We need green space in cities, and particularly in central Wellington City, for the following benefits: 

• recognised health and wellbeing benefits for present and future residents, commuters and visitors; 

• amenity, liveability and economic benefits for Wellington City and its residents; 

• other ecosystem and resilience benefits to mitigate and adapt to climate change and other environmental shocks. 

This report looks at the current provision of public urban green space in central Wellington, and makes recommendations for future strategic design and provision of urban green spaces in relation to current and projected future population levels. It was commissioned by Wellington City Council to complement a context of recent and current planning work relevant to the central city, including the Central City Framework Plan, “Our City Tomorrow”, “Let’s Get Wellington Moving”, “Planning for Growth” and revision of the District Plan. The study was undertaken by urban researchers at University of Otago, Wellington, and Victoria University of Wellington, who are members of the New Zealand Centre for Sustainable Cities.

BLASCHKE, P., GAWLER, S., KIDDLE, L., LOUBSER, D. & PEDERSEN ZARI, M. 2019

Ocean Cities: Sustainable Urban Development For Islands. Regional Policy Guide 

A Report for United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UNESCAP).


The Ocean Cities concept is an integrated policy approach for ocean-focused and climate-responsive urban development strategies, with a focus on urban areas in Pacific island developing States. Ocean Cities are where urban landscapes and seascapes meet, where built and natural environments near coastlines interface and where human behaviour and urban development have profound impacts on both terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Ocean Cities are at the forefront of the climate change consequences, the urbanization challenges and other development pressures. Within the context of ongoing urbanization processes in Pacific island developing States, the guide recognizes the important links between the impacts of urban growth and development, climate change impacts, ocean health and coastal systems, and the effect these factors have on the development and resilience of Ocean Cities.

BLASCHKE, P. M., PEDERSEN ZARI, M., ARCHIE, K. M., JACKSON, B., KOMUGABE-DIXSON, A., LIVESEY, C., LOUBSER, D., MARTINEZ-ALMOYNA GUAL, C., MAXWELL, D., RASTANDEH, A., RENWICK, J. & WEAVER, S. 2017

Ecosystem Assessment and Ecosystem-Based Adaptation (EbA) Options for Port Vila, Vanuatu

Report prepared by Victoria University of Wellington for the Pacific Ecosystem-based Adaptation to Climate Change (PEBACC) Programme of the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP).


Port Vila is the capital and largest city of the Melanesian island nation of Vanuatu, and is situated on the southern coast of Efate, the third largest island in Vanuatu.  The Pacific Ecosystem-based Adaptation to Climate Change (PEBACC) Project responds to these vulnerability challenges. The five-year Project (implemented by the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP)) explores and promotes Ecosystem-based Adaptation (EbA) options for adapting to climate change in the Pacific region.  EbA is the practice of strengthening ecosystems to increase people’s ability to adapt to the impacts of climate change.  It draws upon knowledge of ecosystem services and is based on the premise that if ecosystems are protected, remediated, or regenerated, this leads to healthier ecosystems, more ecosystem services, and therefore greater human wellbeing and resilience to the impacts of climate change. The current study continues the PEBACC project in Vanuatu.  It builds on an earlier PEBACC study that undertook a baseline ecosystem and socio-economic resilience analysis and mapping appraisal of the Port Vila Metropolitan area.  The methodology approach adopted provided for mainly desk-top review work, supplemented by four key workshops (including one in Port Vila), interviews with Port Vila stakeholders, and brief field inspection in Port Vila.

PEDERSEN ZARI, M., BLASCHKE, P. M., LIVESEY, C., MARTINEZ-ALMOYNA GUAL, C., WEAVER, S., ARCHIE, K. M., JACKSON, B., KOMUGABE-DIXSON, A., LOUBSER, D., MAXWELL, D., RASTANDEH, A. & RENWICK, J. 2017

Ecosystem-based Adaptation (EbA) Project Implementation Plans, Port Vila, Vanuatu

Wellington, New Zealand: Report prepared by Victoria University of Wellington for the Pacific Ecosystem-based Adaptation to Climate Change Programme (PEBACC) of the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP).


As part of the process of selecting the proposed EbA projects, an analysis was done of how each project could potentially increase or support the provision of ecosystem services in Port Vila. The following five projects were identified as being of high priority for the Port Vila ridge to reef context in terms of addressing urgent ecological issues and increasing community resilience to vulnerabilities related to climate change and to wider development issues.

 

  1. Riparian corridors regeneration plan
  2. Restoration and protection of coastal vegetation
  3. Intensification of suburban and peri-urban village and settlement home gardens
  4. Urban trees: The strategic introduction of more multi-use trees and vegetation into built up areas of Port Vila
  5. Sustainable housing development

PEDERSEN ZARI, M. & JENKIN, S. 2009.
Rethinking our built environments: Towards a sustainable future
Wellington, Ministry for the Environment, New Zealand Government.


The purpose of this document is to stimulate discussion and debate. It does not seek to determine a particular path, but presents concepts that challenge us to significantly shift our thinking about the built environment. This will allow central government organisations to explore how the concepts discussed in this document could strengthen and progress their policy areas as they relate to the built environment.

The document is directed primarily toward people with a general understanding of sustainability principles. Its key elements are:

  • definition of the concepts of regenerative, restorative, cradle-to-cradle and eco-efficient development
  • identification of the value and opportunities of taking an integrated approach to a sustainable built environment
  • comparison of business-as-usual in New Zealand’s built environment, with the concepts under consideration
  • identification of the environmental, social, cultural and economic benefits for each approach
  • consideration of possibilities for implementing each approach over time.

PEDERSEN ZARI, M. 2009.
Towards a sustainable future: Adopting a regenerative approach to development
Wellington, Ministry for the Environment, New Zealand Government.


This document presents cutting edge thinking on the future of New Zealand's built environments and how they can be made socially, financially and environmentally sustainable. It focuses on the regenerative development approach where the built environment becomes the conduit for producing resources and energy, improving physical and psychological health, remedying past pollution, and transforming and filtering waste into new resources.

PEDERSEN ZARI, M., COUCHMAN, A., GROMM, P., HILL, D., HUDDART, A., QUENNEVILLE, P. & WOOD, C. 2008.
New Zealand as a Test bed: Leading the World Beyond Sustainable Built Environments
Cabinet paper, New Zealand Government.

STOREY, J. B., GJERDE, M., CHARLESON, A. & PEDERSEN, M.
The state of deconstruction in New Zealand
Report to Task Group 39 of The International Council for Research and Innovation in Building and Construction (CIB).

Meeting of the International Research Group CIB TG39 April 2003 Gainesville, Florida


This paper discusses the state of deconstruction in New Zealand. It outlines specific circumstances in New Zealand which affect deconstruction and materials reuse. The paper details techniques, strategies and examples of deconstruction in New Zealand, and provides an overview of legislation, guidelines, governmental bodies and industry organisations that are associated with construction and demolition as well as waste minimisation in New Zealand.

Synopsis available here.